Samir’s Selection 10/07/2015 (p.m.)

  • tags: MaxSchrems ECJ dataprotection privacy Facebook information surveillance NSA EdwardSnowden SafeHarbor quote

    • The ruling undermined the so-called safe harbour legal provision on which 4,400 companies have relied to carry data across the Atlantic since it was adopted 15 years ago.
    • Penny Pritzker, US commerce secretary, said Washington was “deeply disappointed” at the ruling, which would lead to “uncertainty for both US and EU companies and consumers, and puts at risk the thriving transatlantic digital economy”.
    • The ECJ decision also opened national data protection authorities across Europe to requests from citizens to bar their personal information from being sent to the US.
    • The court declared the safe harbour agreement invalid because it stopped Europe’s national data protection watchdogs intervening on behalf of citizens who complained their privacy had been infringed.
    • Christian Borggreen, Europe director of the Computer & Communications Industry Association, a trade body that represents Google, Amazon and eBay, called on the European Commission to provide guidance quickly on how they could operate within the law.
    • In a statement, the court warned that “access on a generalised basis” to electronic communications “must be regarded as compromising the essence of the fundamental right to respect for private life”.
    • “It has ramifications for TTIP,” said Cameron Kerry, a former general counsel at the US Department of Commerce. “Safe harbour is fundamental to the economic relationship. It is difficult to deepen that relationship if the important informational links are unavailable.”
    • The student had taken the Irish Data Protection Commissioner to court, arguing it had failed to protect him from US spying and should suspend data transfers to the US. Mr Schrems brought his case after Edward Snowden, the former NSA contractor, revealed widespread spying by US intelligence agencies online.

       

      However, the Irish data protection authority, which regulates Facebook, said safe harbour in effect banned it from taking action.

       

      An Irish court had asked the EU’s top court whether national data protection authorities were precluded from suspending transfers that had been sanctioned by the European Commission.

    • A US tech executive said the decision would be “highly disruptive” to the industry in the US and Europe. “A lot of these issues of America using surveillance also apply in Europe,” said the executive. “So it’s ridiculous to see this as a one-way street.”
  • Trans-Pacific Partnership

    tags: trade tax tariff deal policy Asia USeconomics regulation corporateinterests labour intellectualproperty disputeresolution investment democracy accountability trust

    • f the negotiations over the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the big trade accord covering twelve countries, which was finalized over the weekend, make anything clear, it’s that trade deals these days have much less to do with the classic ideas of free trade—lowering tariffs and quotas—than with things like intellectual-property rules, regulatory standards, and investor protection. The deal, which now goes to Congress for consideration, does apparently dismantle thousands of tariffs that U.S. goods face in many Asian countries, as well as some of our own trade barriers. But since the U.S. already has very low tariffs, the benefits that their removal will bring to American consumers (and foreign producers) will be small. Even the gains in export sales for American companies, which will find it easier to sell their products abroad, are likely to be modest. Instead, the real impact of this deal is going to be in the regulatory changes it imposes, and in the way it creates a more corporate-friendly environment.

Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s